Fair Trade Competition

LOOK! ARTCAMP ALL-NEW LINES FOR GLOBAL CRAFTS IN DECEMBER 2017:

 Hammered Earring Wires,
only one of hundreds of Artcamp new jewelry product styles
made for Global Crafts in the year 2017.


ALL THESE NEW LINES CREATED BY ARTCAMP WERE IGNORED OR OVERLOOKED
however, GLOBAL CRAFTS ANNOUNCED THE HIRING OF THE HOUSTON DESIGNER

THE JANUARY 2017 JOB-CUT WAS BRUTAL; WITHOUT A WARNING OR EXPLANATION.
ISN’T THIS TOO CRUEL? THESE PEOPLE HAD BEEN WORKING FOR HER FOR YEARS…

“We do not need to have a discussion of our business plan.” writes Renice of Global Crafts:

In this revealing GMail, Renice states what she considers to be Artcamp’s competition :


Here, Renice states that Artcamp “shares the market “with India, Guatemala and Peru.
But the jewelry I see, that she thinks is made in India, is really from China; should be looked-into – this stuff affects the interests of the authentic craftspeople, including the authentic artisans in India too.  Fair Traders source lapidary so-called “Indian jewelry”
from Asians suppliers and use this commercial merchandise to ‘compete’ with Artcamp.

A lot of the Fair Trade jewelry coming on the market now looks to me like Chinese parts.
In other words the parts are produced massively, and some refugees or somebody who
is referred to as “an artisan” strings them together exactly according to a given model.

This kind of ‘assembled’ jewelry has NO cultural content whatsoever. It’s fake jewelry,
and it is ‘fake culture’, and should be seen for what it is, and not allowed in Fair Trade.


Fair Trade should be involved in protecting and promoting true artisans against
dubious merchandise that merchandisers buy for cheap, then sell for good money.

There is NO comparison in the ‘cost of materials’ nor in hand-labor hours, Fair Traders
like to sell this stuff for fifty-dollars or more, because people think it helps the artisans.

Yett Renice coldly informs them that they are on their own, that their competition is
far more worse than daunting; but, why didn’t she offer them some help? the Houston designer lady was a bad joke, the artisans had to pay with their own time and money
to make the lady’s computer print-outs into jewelry because -until now – she had not designed casted-out or constructed soldered-jewelry only assemblages and beadwork.

These women are told that that they are competing against Made-in-China products.
Isn’t Fair Trade supposed to help them?, not challenge them with commercial products
that are probably NOT helping any artisan family, way over there in Africa and/or Eurasia.

To my ear, it sounds very cruel to show them this commercial merchandise and say:
“there you are girls, you are up against globalism itself; good luck.” Just too cruel
and insensitive. Renice had sold a million dollars of their products but now she
is through with them! …some of the most creative artisans in the Americas, and proven over the years to be reliable and faithful suppliers to her company, Global Crafts of Florida.

 FAKE CULTURAL CONTENT GUATEMALA BEADWORK

Guatemala beadwork is generally bereft of cultural content. Typically, there are no real
artisans beadwork culture. For one, the beads are illegally imported by the foreigners
around Santiago. The beadworks are strictly piece-workers who are told exactly what
to make and they are paid by a rate that is not enough for the family to eat meat.
Ask someone who knows anything about the Guatemala jewelry scene. I would be open
to a public discussion about the nature of Guatemalan beadwork over the past thirty-forty years. Who makes this stuff? Is Guatemalan beadwork the same as the kind of jewelry
as made by Artcamp? Do the Guatemalan beadworkers have any representation
whatsover with the Fair Trade dealers and customers. You can be sure they do NOT.

(Guatemala ‘weavers’ is a different story. They were there before gringos came)


Same with Peru. I looked at this Peruvian jewelry on the sites provided by Renice
as examples of Artcamp’s competition, according to her. Much of what I see has been around for decades, the standard stuff for tourists. It does not look like new production
to me. More like somebody acquires this stuff from out of ubiquitous over-production lots.

The pieces I see these Fair Traders selling might have been obtained years ago by a dealer
and re-sold as merchandise, now it is retailed as providing benefits to a 3rd World artisan,
– which might not be true, if the person who actually made the piece has been long dead.

From the images on some Fair Trade websites – the pictured authors of the pieces don’t
look like artisans. Where are their tools? Why the exact same images year-after-year?
These people are not artisans. ¿Whose kidding who? What are their cel phone numbers?

I don’t care WHO Fair Trade fools. Settle this dispute and do right by these women and
I hope that you don’t run into another novelist with friends who are traditional artisans.

Why should I care about the sins of others? I probably have plenty of my own;
even some I didn’t know about until I come under a fantastic whispering attack
by Fair Traders. I challenge you one and all to an open discussion and/or debate.


Global Crafts Targets Fair Trade Market * Read… CNN Money

So, Global Crafts has a credit line of 300,000 dollars. That makes it easy to maneuver.
If Global Crafts ever wanted to invest in the Artcamp Cooperative, wouldn’t they have?

Seven years is a fashion cycle. The Artcamp cooperative had been reliable and very profitable for Global Crafts. The group was seeking zero-percent government funding:

The record shows that women did a great job for them, but Global Crafts ran away:
Global Crafts pretended that abandoning those families was only ordinary market action.

It was just too cruel and senseless, Renice Jones can not possibly have meant do do this!
Maybe she were thinking about money-profit, and the artisan’s lives were rather vague and abstract to her. Same with Kevin: he was simply blind to the needs of his suppliers whose indigeous community initiative was to him no more than another routine Fair Trade promo.

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